NEAPTIDE PROJECTS

(Salcombe) Ltd

PUBLISHING ~ SCRIPTS ~ SCREENPLAYS ~ MANAGEMENT

Neaptide Projects Ltd


The Studio at Myrana, Drake Road, Salcombe, Devon, TQ8 8GE, United Kingdom

Telephome: +44 (0)1548 843329

E Mail: david@neaptide.co.uk

Copyright © Neaptide Projects (Salcombe) Ltd. All rights reserved 2010

Neaptide Projects Ltd


The Studio at Myrana, Drake Road, Salcombe, Devon, TQ8 8GE, United Kingdom

Telephome: +44 (0)1548 843329

E Mail: david@neaptide.co.uk

Copyright © Neaptide Projects (Salcombe) Ltd. All rights reserved 2010
Copyright © Neaptide Projects (Salcombe) Ltd. All rights reserved 2010



THE NATIONAL TRUST  at OVERBECKS

Nr. SALCOMBE, SOUTH DEVON


INVITES AUTHOR

TO A BOOK LAUNCH AND SIGNING

OF


THE FIELDS OF THYME

on

SATURDAY 29TH JUNE 2013

11.00am > 2.00pm


The occasion forms a very modest part of The National Trust’s weekend celebration, to ‘commemorate 75 years since the gardens were first opened to the public


Due to a kind invitation by the Management of The National Trust at Overbeck’s Museum and Gardens; release of The Fields of Thyme has been set for Saturday 29th June, when the publishers will combine their launch of The book, with a signing by its author, David Cohen.


The ‘Meet & Greet’ occasion will take place between 11.00am and 2.00pm in the Conservatory to the former house of Mr Otto Overbeck, a research chemist, traveller and ‘idiosyncratic collector’ whose many exhibits are on public display in the main building, whilst much of the interesting and exotic flora and fauna may also be found and admired in the estate’s beautiful gardens.


This glorious coastal idyll was gifted to The National Trust by Mr Overbeck in 1937, and during the weekend of 29th  and 30th  June, the Trustees are celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the gardens being opened to the public; to which momentous occasion the publishers are delighted to play an extremely modest part.


In truth it may puzzle some people why the launch and place of David Cohen’s wartime novel is considered appropriate during The National Trust’s far more noteworthy celebration; to which the writer says:


“Although the main body of the narrative is set in 1943 / 44’, in fact the story begins in (almost) present time at Overbecks, and I hope that just a glance through the opening pages of the book, will put people in the mood to engage with so much that happened and might have happened at the estate,  and in the territories which surround it.”


BOOK LAUNCH